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Kansas Lawmaker's Ignorant Remark Reveals Anti-Gun Denial Of RTC Facts

by Mark Chesnut, Editor - Monday, February 20, 2017

Kansas Lawmaker's Ignorant Remark Reveals Anti-Gun Denial Of RTC Facts


Photo credit: AP Photo/Nicholas Clayton

Two opposing views stated during the recent debate over a concealed-carry measure in Kansas shows the disconnect that anti-gunners and many in the so-called "mainstream" media have regarding the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms.

The state's House Federal and State Affairs Committee recently rejected a bill that would have allowed the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan., to continue banning concealed firearms. While that's noteworthy, the statements made surrounding the vote once again show how those opposed to law-abiding Americans carrying concealed handguns for self-defense ignore facts that prove they are on the wrong side of the issue.

Democrat Kansas state Rep. Boog Highberger is an excellent example.In fact, Rep. Highberger, it has little to do with fear—and you likely know that.

"A skinny little guy like me can walk around these places without feeling fear," Highberger ignorantly stated. "I don't understand why so many other people are so afraid that they feel compelled to carry a firearm into these places at all times." (Ed. It doesn't mean that people are afraid. And it is not about being afraid in these places it is about having your firearm while you leave home and be in places before you get to your destination.)

In fact, Rep. Highberger, it has little to do with fear—and you likely know that. Is it possible that your ridiculous statement was simply all you could come up with at the time, since there are no real "facts" on your side of this debate?

Why didn't you simply argue that policies allowing law-abiding people to carry concealed firearms make everyone less safe? Maybe it's because you are aware that over the past 30 years, as more and more states have loosened carry regulations, violent crime has dropped drastically.

Why didn't you make the argument that allowing carry in more locations will cause "blood to run in the streets," take us back to the "Wild, Wild West," and lead to road rage shootouts on every street corner? Perhaps it's because you know that concealed-carry permit holders nationwide are among the most law-abiding citizens anywhere. Indeed, according to data provided by the states of Florida and Texas, concealed carriers are between six and 10 times less likely to commit a crime than even police officers (who, in turn, are more law-abiding than the general population).

Why don't you just admit you are wrong on the issue and find something else to oppose? The then-president of the Dallas Police Association lobbied hard against the right to carry in the early 1990s. A few years later, he conceded honorably that "the horror stories I thought would come to pass didn't happen. No bogeyman."Why don't you just admit you are wrong on the issue and find something else to oppose?

"I think," he added, that "it's worked out well, and that says good things about the citizens who have permits. I'm a convert."

Instead, Rep. Highberger, you chose to take the easy way out—the way most often preferred by those who don't have facts on their side. But calling proponents "afraid" isn't an argument, it's a cop-out.

On the other side of the coin, Republican Kansas state Rep. Trevor Jacobs' statement showed a true understand of the Second Amendment and concealed carry.

"It is about our God-given rights to protect ourselves—myself, my family, my property," Jacobs said.

Rep. Highberger, is that really so hard to understand?

Mark Chesnut has been the editor of America's 1st Freedom magazine for nearly 17 years and is an avid hunter, shooter and political observer.