Tweet
original link

All the links on this page are broken
See instead gunbanfacts.com

Why Tens of Millions of Gun Owners Are Right

In 2008, the Supreme Court ruled in District of Columbia v. Heller that the Second Amendment protects a pre-existing, fundamental, individual right to keep and bear arms. This is the same view of the amendment held by the framers of the Bill of Rights, the most universally respected legal scholars of the 19th century, the vast majority of Second Amendment scholars today, most Americans throughout our nation's history, and the Supreme Court in earlier decisions. It is also the view advocated by the NRA for decades.


Protected by the Second Amendment, tens of millions of Americans own firearms that gun control supporters call "assault weapons" and standard ammunition magazines that gun control supporters call "large," for the same reasons they and other Americans own all firearms, such as self-defense, hunting, competitive and recreational target shooting, training and collection-building.


In this section of our website, we explain the high and growing popularity of so-called "assault weapons" and "large" magazines, how Americans use them for traditional purposes, why the Second Amendment protects the right to keep and bear them, what the federal ban of 1994-2004 did (and didn't do) and why it was irrelevant to crime trends, and how gun control supporters have tried to increase the numbers of firearm categories that would be prohibited by "assault weapon" bans, potentially affecting many tens of millions of gun owners.


Why "Tens of Millions?" Tens of millions of Americans-perhaps many tens of millions-own firearms that gun control supporters call "assault weapons" and ammunition magazines that gun control supporters call "large," for self-defense, hunting, sports and other traditional purposes.


Right about the Second Amendment. In 2008, the Supreme Court ruled in District of Columbia v. Heller that the Second Amendment protects a pre-existing, fundamental, individual right to keep and bear arms, the view held by the Framers of the Bill of Rights, the most universally respected legal scholars of the 19th century, the vast majority of Second Amendment scholars today, most Americans throughout our nation's history, and the Supreme Court in earlier decisions. The Court rejected the two mutually-exclusive theories of the amendment that gun control supporters had advocated for the previous few decades.


Right about the Second Amendment protecting the right to keep and bear so-called "assault weapons" and "large" ammunition magazines. The Second Amendment protects the right to keep and bear arms for self-defense and common defense purposes, purposes for which "assault weapons" and "large" magazines are well-suited.


Right about gun control supporters trying to get more categories of guns banned as "assault weapons". First it was semi-automatics that have detachable magazines and external attachments. Now it's those firearms, plus semi-automatics that don't have detachable magazines, plus those that don't have external attachments, plus pump-action firearms. Gun control supporters keep expanding their lists of guns to be banned, hoping people who don't know one gun from another will go along with banning them, so long as they're called "assault weapons."


Right about how the expired federal ban defined guns as "assault weapons."


The ban said that a rifle was an "assault weapon" if it was semi-automatic, used a detachable magazine, and had two or more external attachments, such as a pistol-type grip and a telescoping (adjustable-length) stock. All of these attributes are common to millions of firearms that have never been defined as "assault weapons."


Right about the irrelevance of gun control to crime. Gun control groups have claimed that Americans cannot be trusted with handguns, nor to carry handguns for protection, nor to have "assault weapons" or "large" ammunition magazines. However, the numbers of handguns, Right-to-Carry states, "assault weapons" and "large" magazines have risen to all-time highs, and violent crime has fallen to a 37-year low.


Right about the guns themselves. Millions of gun owning Americans, who know infinitely more about firearms than their critics, prefer durable, versatile firearms that can be easily configured for self-defense, hunting, competition and other purposes.


Right about firearms and self-defense. The most comprehensive study of defensive gun uses ever conducted-the methodology of which the preeminent anti-gun criminologist in the United States deemed unassailable-found that semi-automatic pistols accounted for the majority of handguns, and 40 percent of all firearms, used for self-defense.


Right about firearms, marksmanship training, and sports. Ownership and use of firearms that are particularly suitable for, or readily adaptable to, defensive purposes not only improves the ability of good Americans to defend themselves against criminals, it maintains the tradition of Americans being trained in the use of arms in the event they are called upon to serve the nation, and it leads to improvements in marksmanship, firearms handling techniques, and firearms and their accessories.


Right about firearms and hunting. Firearms that gun control supporters call "assault weapons" are widely used for hunting, and their use for that purpose is increasing every year.