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Assault Weapons Are A Myth

After Lying For 30 Years, New York Times Finally Admits "Assault Weapons Are A Myth"
BY STEVE STRAUB ON SEPTEMBER 13, 2014

In an amazing editorial the NY Times admits that "assault weapon" is a made up term created by anti-gun Democrats to scare low information voters. Stunningly they also admit there's no proof the "assault weapons" ban had any impact on crime.

It was much the same in the early 1990s when Democrats created and then banned a category of guns they called "assault weapons." America was then suffering from a spike in gun crime and it seemed like a problem threatening everyone. Gun murders each year had been climbing: 11,000, then 13,000, then 17,000.

Democrats decided to push for a ban of what seemed like the most dangerous guns in America: assault weapons, which were presented by the media as the gun of choice for drug dealers and criminals, and which many in law enforcement wanted to get off the streets. This politically defined category of guns - a selection of rifles, shotguns and handguns with "military-style" features - only figured in about 2 percent of gun crimes nationwide before the ban.

Handguns were used in more than 80 percent of murders each year, but gun control advocates had failed to interest enough of the public in a handgun ban. Handguns were the weapons most likely to kill you, but they were associated by the public with self-defense. (In 2008, the Supreme Court said there was a constitutional right to keep a loaded handgun at home for self-defense.)

Banning sales of military-style weapons resonated with both legislators and the public: Civilians did not need to own guns designed for use in war zones.

On Sept. 13, 1994, President Bill Clinton signed an assault weapons ban into law. It barred the manufacture and sale of new guns with military features and magazines holding more than 10 rounds. But the law allowed those who already owned these guns - an estimated 1.5 million of them - to keep their weapons.

The policy proved costly. Mr. Clinton blamed the ban for Democratic losses in 1994. Crime fell, but when the ban expired, a detailed study found no proof that it had contributed to the decline. The Democrats created then banned a class of weapons by purposefully deceiving the American people.

Bearing Arms reports:

"Assault weapons" is a made-up term, used to scare citizens into thinking that military weapons were commonly being sold and used on the streets of the United States. Thanks to a dishonest and incompetent media, millions of Americans thought (and still think) that machine guns could simply be purchased at the local gun store. The reality that the Hughes Amendment to the Firearm Owners Protection Act outlawed the manufacture of automatic weapons for the civilian market in 1986, was always hushed up.

Yes, it has been 28 years since a single machine gun was manufactured for the American public. There are no assault rifles being sold in the United States. There are only firearms that look like weapons of war, but which lack their ability to fire multiple shots with a single pull of the trigger.

These firearms-AR-15s, AKMs and similar rifles-while incredibly popular with America's law-abiding gun culture, simply aren't used in many crimes. This should be surprising, since they are now among the most popular firearms sold in the United States in the past decade.

In fact there are now 10 times as many AR-15 type rifles in the hands of citizens than there are visually similar M4/M16 assault rifles in the U.S. Military. The op-ed concludes by stating:

"This is not just a gun issue, this is an unemployment issue, it's a poverty issue, it's a family issue, it's a culture of violence issue," Mr. Landrieu said.

More than 20 years of research funded by the Justice Department has found that programs to target high-risk people or places, rather than targeting certain kinds of guns, can reduce gun violence.

David M. Kennedy, the director of the Center for Crime Prevention and Control at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, argues that the issue of gun violence can seem enormous and intractable without first addressing poverty or drugs. A closer look at the social networks of neighborhoods most afflicted, he says, often shows that only a small number of men drive most of the violence. Identify them and change their behavior, and it's possible to have an immediate impact. This is another stunning admission by the NY Times, that poverty and drugs have more to do with violent crime than what kind of weapon is available.

But don't expect the NY Times to suddenly become pro-second amendment simply because of this one editorial. They and their editorial writers still believe that guns are the root of all violence but it is nice to see an honest article on the subject for once.

Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed; as they are in almost every kingdom of Europe. The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword; because the whole body of the people are armed, and constitute a force superior to any band of regular troops that can be, on any pretence, raised in the United States. - Noah Webster, An Examination into the Leading Principles of the Federal Constitution, 1787